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YatPundit’s Pub – Brown Butter in Mid-City

Brown Butter Mid-City
(cross-posted to YatPundit)

brown butter mid-city

Brown Butter Mid-City for Lunch

Brown Butter
231 N. Carrollton Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70119
(504) 609-3871

www.brownbutterrestaurant.com

Reservations via OpenTable (click to the restaurant’s website above)

From the restaurant’s website:

Located at the corner of N Carrollton and Bienville in Mid City New Orleans, we are the city’s destination for Contemporary Southern American cuisine in a comfortable cozy setting.  Our goal is to challenge your palate with new and exciting flavors while anchoring our ingredients in the comforting and familiar.  We are the place for a quick lunch, fine dinner, business/special event or just a beer and small plates for the game.

Went out to lunch yesterday with the “Todd Price Taste Club,” for the group’s first lunch outing. Had a great time at Brown Butter on Carrollton and Bieville in Mid-City.

HUGE CORRECTION TO THE POD: I refer to the group as “Todd Price Eats and Drinks. That is actually the name of Todd’s old Facebook page. Now, Todd, Ann, and Brett from NOLA dot com aggregate all their stuff on a single Facebook group, Where NOLA Eats. Sorry, Todd, I’ll get it right next time. 🙂

brown butter mid-city

Menu for the Todd Price Taste Club group lunch at Brown Butter (Todd Price photo)

Starters

Brown Butter Mid-City

Salad starter at Brown Butter

Brown Butter Mid-City

Brussels Sprouts starter at Brown Butter (Todd Price photo)

The two starters were a Gem Lettuce salad with radish, fennel, onion, and Pecorino, with an herb vinaigrette. Our second starter was Flash-fried Brussel Sprouts. While just about everyone else got the sprouts, I got the salad and snitched some of the Brussels Sprouts from others. Both were good, but the Brussels Sprouts were the winner.

Mains

Brown Butter Mid-City

Brown Butter Burger (nowneworleans photo)

Brown Butter Mid-City

Smoked Brisket at Brown Butter.

The Brown Butter Burger, with pimento cheese, pickled red onion, roasted garlic aioli, on a brioche bun with house cut fries.

Our second option was Smoked Brisket with skillet corn bread, vinegar slaw, along with a white sauce and a smoked onion and apple BBQ sauce. I had the brisket. It was great.

Folks who got the burger also enjoyed their choice!

Dessert

Brown Butter Mid-City

Chocolate Torte at Brown Butter

In addition to the beef and burgers, we enjoyed a chocolate torte. The dessert had whipped cream and an Amarena Cherry sauce. Tasty!

Be sure to check out Ali’s blog at NowNewOrleans dot com!

 

 

 

TDAC Sushi Feature Today

TDAC Sushi Feature Today

TDAC Sushi!

TDAC sushi

“Sushi, Sashimi, and Nigiri” by JJ Galloway (via TDAC)

TDAC Sushi – They Draw and Cook

Today’s featured collection on They Draw and Cook is Sushi! I got started eating sushi as a student at UNO, in the late 1970s. A lot of folks do the “oh, I’m not going to eat raw fish,” but it’s easy to get into sushi for New Orleanians. That’s because we all grew up eating seafood. Start your non-sushi-eating friends with the cooked stuff, such as shrimp, or maybe a crawfish roll. Both are boiled, and the flavors are actually quite tame in comparison to Zatarain’s Crab Boil. Others will suggest going with egg sushi, but cooked seafood makes much more sense for people who grew up on the Gulf Coast.

Learning to eat sushi in New Orleans

That’s how it was for me. Two pieces of shrimp nigiri and a crawfish roll, then some teriyaki or tempura. Eventually, your curiosity gets the better of you, particularly if you have friends who are totally into sushi. You see them eating tuna, salmon, yellowtail. The fish is sliced thin. You think, it can’t be so bad, right? Then you put that first piece in your mouth. You’re already into the rice, the little bit of wasabi used to hold the seafood to the rice, and the soy sauce you dip it all in. Maybe you dip that first piece of fish in a lot of soy sauce. Turns out that you didn’t freak out.

Now you’re into the basics of American sushi eaters. From here, it gets fun. Split a rainbow roll, or whatever your local place calls the basic California roll that they lay out as a multi-color spectacle. Dig in! Eventually, you start cutting back on the amount of soy sauce you use. The taste of the fish appeals to you. Maybe you go beyond your comfort-fish types. Even if you don’t, it’s still a fun experience.

Top Oyster Spots in New Orleans (@GoNOLA504 article)

Top Oyster Spots in New Orleans (@GoNOLA504 article)

Top Oyster spots offer a great range of choices.

top oyster spots

Restaurant Antoine, the oldest restaurant in New Orleans. (GoNOLA dot com photo)

Top Oyster spots – I’ve got a few quibbles

This list of places in town to get good oysters isn’t bad. GoNOLA.com rarely puts forward a bad or controversial set of recommendations. Still, I’ve got a couple of quibbles with the list, as well as a few comments.

Best raw: I’ve got no argument with Manale’s, but don’t think they’re the only place in town. A lot depends on how you’re ordering your erstas. If you’re sitting at an oyster bar, chatting up the shucker, then the entertainment is a factor. If you’re just having them brought to the table, you’ll get good raw from a lot of places, such as Mr. Ed’s, Katie’s, and the places out on the lakefront. Casamento’s is still the fun, “old school” experience.

Rockefeller/Bienville: For Rockefeller, Antoine’s invented the dish. Their version doesn’t use spinach, but finely-chopped green onion. Other places just don’t taste the same. I prefer Antoine’s Bienville to Arnaud’s, but that’s a quibble. I’d get shrimp remoulade at Arnaud’s over the oysters, anyway. If you’re going to Antoine’s, the best option is to get the “2-2-2” – two Rockefeller, two Bienville, and two Foch.

Po-Boy: I’m not going to a full-service restaurant for a po-b0y. I’m going to a po-boy place. Go to Parkway or Parasol’s with a friend. Have them get an oyster sandwich, you get a shrimp, and split them.

Charbroiled – They’re A Thing these days

Definitely a top oyster spot — Drago’s invented the charbroiled oyster. They still do them well. It’s a lot of fun to go to a school or church fair where Tommy brings out one of the trailers and sells charbroiled oysters. The dish has expanded beyond Drago’s, however. Like Rockefeller and Bienville, you can get charbroiled at a number of places in town. My favorite is Katie’s in Mid City. I’m not going to turn down your invitation to join you for dinner at Drago’s, but if you let me make the plans, I’m going to say, let’s go see Chef Scot at Katie’s

Drinking and Erstas

I don’t see the two as compatible. Oyster shooter? What’s the point? The idea of sucking down an oyster so fast you can’t taste it is something for folks who say they hate them raw. Oysters at happy hour? Meh. Eat oysters or drink cheap liquor. Still, if you say, “we’re going over to Blind Pelican for happy hour,” I’ll say, I’m on my way.

Side comment on Acme Oyster House: the one in the Quarter is a zoo. No, it’s not just a zoo, it’s always a zoo. Acme has good food. Go out to Metairie to enjoy it.

The bottom line

We’re talking oysters here. If you like the place, and their seafood is cold and fresh, it’s going to be a good time.

What’s your place for oysters?

 

 

Dinner at Vessel New Orleans (Mid-City)

Dinner at Vessel New Orleans (Mid-City)

Vessel New Orleans in Mid-City

Vessel New Orleans

Vessel New Orleans is fun!

I felt uninspired when it came to cooking dinner last Saturday, so we decided to go out. Vessel New Orleans was our to-try list for some time. I went to their page on Open Table, and easily booked a table. Almost too easy, in fact, to the point where I feared the place might not be so hot.

I was wrong!

Cocktails

Vessel New Orleans

“Violet Delights Have Violent Ends” at Vessel New Orleans

The place was active, in spite of the wide open options on Open Table. For now, at least, it’s a place where Mid-City folks walk in. As I sipped my “Violent Delights Have Violent Ends” cocktail, people began to come in. The cocktail, made of Sheep Dip Blended Scotch, Liquore D’Erbe Tosolini Amaro, St. George Spiced Pear Liquor, Lime, and Ginger Beer, was refreshing. I’m always worried about Scotch-based cocktails, but this was nice. Mrs. YatPundit had a French 75. It was cool that they asked her if she wanted it based on gin or brandy. She chose gin.

Vessel New Orleans

Cheese Plate at Vessel New Orleans

We started with a cheese plate with three cheeses. Left to right in the photo were a buffalo cheese with housemade strawberry preserves, pecorino with honey, and a Mediterranean Farm Cheese. The buffalo was creamy and smooth, a good pairing with the strawberry preserves and grilled lavash bread. The pecorino and honey was Mrs. YatPundit’s fave, and I enjoyed it as well. The farm cheese on the right had a nice peppery crust to it that paired well with my cocktail. Conclusion here: Mrs. YatPundit said next visit, she’ll likely order the cheese plate as a main, as it’s a good small-plate/light entree. I could probably do the same, but there are a lot of other interesting small plate and flatbread options.

The Mains

No photos of the mains, alas. My family does not indulge my #foodporn habit well. After taking pics of the cocktail menu, the lovely copper mug, and the cheese, then putting them up on Instagram, I figured I should give it a rest.

Wife got the house fettucine, shrimp, oyster, crawfish, house tasso, and creole cream. She didn’t care for the fact that the shrimp were whole and unpeeled. It’s easy to toss 15-count shrimp on a grill, then on top of a pasta bowl, but then the diner has to peel it. So, the dish would have been better with the shrimp peeled in the kitchen. Once she got past that, however, it was all good. The oysters were chopped fine, and the crawfish were a good size. Vessel New Orleans’ tasso is spicy, and it does the job tasso is supposed to do, spread out through a sauce, reducing the need for additional salt or pepper. Since I didn’t get any of the shrimp, I got all the good stuff to taste, minus the peeling experience.

My entree was the house pappardelle pasta, louisiana wild boar ragu, with pecorino. Very tasty. Pappardelle is a fun, broad-noodle pasta, and the ragu (Shouldn’t that be ragout? Nevermind.) was very flavorful. Good base, and the shreeded boar was thick and tasty.

Wine

Vessel New Orleans

Planeta La Segreta wine at Vessel New Orleans

While the cocktails carried us though the cheese, wine was naturally necessary. We chose a white, Planeta La Segreta, from Sicily. One of the managers stopped by to check on us and asked after the wine. He said it was new for them. It was a Pinot Grigio blended with something else that I don’t remember now, but that’s OK. I’ll look for it at Pearl and/or Martin on my next wine run.

 

Dessert

Vessel New Orleans

Isot chile Vairhorns chocolate cake at Vessel

We split the Isot chile Vairhorns chocolate cake. It came with a white chocolate pudding and a taste of cherry sorbet. I could have had a full scoop of that sorbet and been happy. The cake was good. The dish looks like one of those silly deconstructed things, but it was just a cool presentation.

In addition to the tasty dessert, I had a cup of coffee (French pressed) to round out the evening. Next time, we’ll arrange a ride home, and I’ll have another cocktail.

Vessel New Orleans is in the 3800 block of Iberville, in the old church behind Schoen Funeral Home at Canal and N. Scott Street, therefore it’s easy to get to from downtown. Take the Canal Streetcar (either City Park or Cemeteries), and get off at the funeral home.

 

The cost of poboys – interesting analysis by @TPrice504

The cost of poboys – interesting analysis by @TPrice504

poboys

Poboy sign at Danny and Clydes at Clearview and West Esplanade in Metairie

photo article on NOLA.comphoto article on NOLA.com

Poboys have come a long way

Are poboys too expensive? This is a great short photo article on NOLA.com. The analyis is solid, even if the average price of the sandwiches in the article was $9.66. When I was an undergrad at UNO, poboys at The Bakery were in the $3.00 to $4.00 range. Todd Price’s data, as well as a quick check at the Bureau of Labor Statistics bear this out.

The per-inch price

poboys

$1.24 per inch for Roast Beef (courtesy NOLA.com)

This was the number that struck me as most relevant. A lot of places sell large and small-size sandwiches. Go to R&O’s in Bucktown and order their Italian Special sandwich. They’ll ask if you want the 5″ half or the 9″ whole. Their 5″ Roast Beef is $6.45, which is just a bit higher than the article’s $1.24/inch calculation.

Affordable poboys

poboys

Large Roast Beef Poboy from Danny and Clydes, $8.99

There are so many options as to what goes into a poboy. The article focuses on the three most expensive fillings: roast beef, oysters, and shrimp. All three tend to be more expensive than other items on the typical menu. It’s possible to find sandwiches less expensive than the ones discussed. Perhaps
On the other end, how about a whole-loaf sandwich, like the whole-loaf hot dog poboy from The Bakery, continued at Koz’s. The Koz’s sandwich is $12. Using the article’s $1.24/inch, that’s close to a $40 poboy! Sure, hot dogs aren’t roast beef, but still, a full-loaf poboy that can be split three or four ways comes out to $3-$4 apiece. Then there are places like Danny and Clydes (top photo), where you can get a $6 regular poboy. Again, it’s not oysters, but it’s cheap.

It’s about the bread

poboys

Binder’s Bakery, in the Marigny

It’s important to keep in mind that the bread makes a poboy, not the fillings. good french bread from Leidenheimer’s, Binder’s, Gendusa’s, that’s what it’s all about. You don’t want to put out $12 for a shrimp poboy? Go get a hotdog or french fry poboy for $4-$6. Both of them are made with the same french bread. Both are delicious!

Cooking for the dorm at Tulane

spoon university tulane

Spoon University goes to Tulane

What a great story about a couple of guys attending Tulane University, and how they’re cooking for dorm-mates in Monroe Hall.

Planning a Tulane dorm meal

In any restaurant/cafe/diner, a cook comes in and cooks. The chef de cuisine has to plan things, though. Hunter and Ben are already learning some solid lessons about restaurant management:

As usual, the duo sat down on Wednesday night and brainstormed a menu for the upcoming weekend. Once they decided on their meal, they trekked over to the store on Friday for all their ingredients. This process seems straightforward, but it’s not without difficulties. Ben confesses, “We have to meet a few times a week to talk about paying for groceries, and we have to consider what Whole Foods has in season. We also change our ideas ten times a week.”

I’ll have to ask Chef CDB and others in the business if this is a good step into professional kitchen management. My instincts say yes, but what do I know, I’m a computer geek.

Making Money

Hunter and Ben appear to have the financial side of their dinners-for-twelve under control:

Hunter agrees, saying, “It’s just about the cooking! And it’s something that sets us apart from everyone else.” While they’re running a successful business with no shortage of potential, all profits so far have gone towards supplies for cooking (think everything from pots and pans to aprons).

And in the style of a starting-out rock band, they’re putting the profits back into equipment. Who knows, maybe they’ll be able to start a pop-up, if the amass the right equipment list.

The article says that they can have over a hundred requests to join them, so a seat at their table is hard to come by. Best of luck to Hunter and Ben and their venture!

Coolinary Dinner at Muriel’s Jackson Square

Coolinary Dinner at Muriel’s Jackson Square

Muriel's Jackson Square

Front dining room at Muriel’s Jackson Square

We never took kiddo out for his 22nd birthday in July. He ran off to Houston to see Copa America Centenario games with his friends and his study plan for the CPA exam (he’s taken three parts so far, got a 99 on Audit, a 98 on FAR, and BEC score isn’t back yet) keeps him busy. When everyone realized this past weekend was a quiet one, I made a reservaton for us at Muriel’s Jackson Square.

 Coolinary at Muriel’s Jackson Square

Muriel's Jackson Square

Sazerac!

Muriel's Jackson Square

“Saint 75” in the foreground, “Fleur de Lis”, background

Cocktails! Kiddo reported that his first Sazerac was good. I had a “Saint 75”, Muriel’s variant of the classic French 75 cocktail. Mrs. YatPundit had a “Fleur de Lis” – Stoli Razberi, Chambord, fruit juice, and bubbles.

Appetizers

All three of us decided to go with the Coolinary pre-fixe menu. The “Coolinary” concept is a citywide promotion/event for the month of August. It’s sponsored by the city’s CVB, to promote dining out in the heat of the month. It works. So, kiddo had the gumbo, and Mrs. YatPundit had the “Fontana’s West End Turtle Soup” (above).

Muriel's Jackson Square

Turtle Soup

Muriel's Jackson Square

Gorgonzola Chesecake

I had the “Savory Gorgonzola Cheesecake” – a Gorgonzola and Prosciutto terrine, with honeyed pecans and apple slices. Oh. My.

Entrees

Muriel's Jackson Square

Pecan-crusted Drum

Muriel's Jackson Square

Double-cut pork chop

Mrs. YatPundit got the Pecan Encrusted Drum for her entree, while kiddo and I both got the Double Cut Pork Chop. The “sugar cane apple glaze” on the pork chop was absolutely fantastic.

The tastes I swiped of the drum were wonderful. In addition to these two entrees, Muriel’s Jackson Square’s Coolinary menu offers Shrimp and Grits, Wood Grilled Chicken, and “BayouBaisse”, the restaurant’s take on bouillabaisse.

For wine with dinner, we shared a bottle of Duckhorn’s 2014 Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc.

Dessert

Muriel's Jackson Square

Flourless chocolate cake

Muriel's Jackson Square

Crème brûlée

Dessert: we each got one of the three on the menu, Flourless Chocolate Cake, Crème brûlée, and Pain Perdu Bread Pudding.

Muriel's Jackson Square

Fonseca 20yr Aged Tawny Port

A lovely meal!

Muriel’s Jackson Square

801 Chartres Street
Phone: 504.568.1885
Email: ldgratia@gmail.com
HOURS

Bistro: Lunch & Dinner
7 Days a Week

Lunch: Mon-Sat 11:30am – 2:30pm

Sunday Jazz Brunch: 10:30am – 2pm
Featuring Joe Simon’s Jazz Trio

Dinner: Sun -Thurs 5:30pm – 10pm
Friday 5:30pm – 10:30pm
Saturday 5:00pm – 10:30pm

Croque Madame at Wakin Bakin

wakin bakin

“Zak Attack” – a Croque Madame at Wakin’ Bakin’ in #NOLAMidCity

(author’s note: I’m not affiliated with Wakin Bakin, other than being a very happy regular customer)

I can’t say I don’t like going to Columbus, OH, for work. My colleagues there are great people and the Columbus Food Scene (#CbusFoodScene on Instagram) is pretty good. Still, like Glinda told Dorothy, there’s no place like home. I hit The Wall of humidity as I walked out of the artificial confines of Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport yesterday evening, and relaxed. Home.

Breakfast in Mid City

Home means time to myself. I’m not a morning person, but I do get up early. It’s the price I pay to be a teacher. So, while the rest of the family is still happily crashed, I slip out and go for a walk, breakfast, and some coffee. When I don’t have any obligations (like going back to the house to teach a class via WebEx), I wander into Mid City. I’ve missed Wakin’ Bakin’! It’s been almost three weeks since my last visit here.

Naturally, one of the reasons I miss WB is their grits. The menu standards here are breakfast burritos of various kinds and “breakfast bowls”. The bowl starts with a base, grits, black beans, or hash browns. Add meat, veggies, or both, and top with eggs cooked as you like. My standard “bowl” is grits, bacon, chorizo, cheese, eggs over easy. This is what I had on my brain as I walked from the Cemeteries Terminal at Canal and City Park down here. I walked in the door, and the special board said “Zak Attack” – a Croque Madame. WB’s Mornay sauce is solid, their ham is tasty, and, well, I’ll get some grits tomorrow. The coffee is good, and the tunes are old-school this morning. While this was quite filling, there are some mini-sized Peanut Butter-Chocolate Cheesecakes in the cooler that are teasing me.

It’s good to be home.

Dinner off the special board at Katies (@katiesmidcity)

LT Firstborn came down for a week to attend his ten-year reunion for the Brother Martin High School. He had fun with the Class of 2016! The family naturally took him to get All The Foods. That included dinner at Katies in Mid City.

 

katies

Oysters Slessinger at Katie’s

Starting off at Katies
Katies

Katie’s has Batture Blonde Ale from Second Line Brewery in Mid City on tap

It was the four of us, and the boys wanted beer, so we got mom a glass of Pinot Grigio as they explored the taps. I had “Batture Blonde Ale” from Second Line Brewery, a micro just a few blocks from the restaurant.

The only thing we ordered off the menu was the starter, Oysters Slessinger (above). We usually get the regular char-grilled oysters, but Mr. Branley wanted the blown-out version. The Slessinger are topped with provel cheese, bacon, spinach, and shrimp. I find them to be overkill. I don’t mind at all.

The Special Board

Katies

The special board at Katie’s always has wonderful choices!

Several good options on the board that evening! Both the boys got the Redfish Noel (I’m not allowed to photograph their food, alas). Mrs. YatPundit got the Seafood Ravioli, I got the softshell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

katies

Seafood Ravioli at Katie’s

Seafood ravioli over fried eggplant, topped with a creamy sauce and shrimp. For Chef Scot Craig, this is actually an easy special to put together. Chef’s really got his basic sauces dialed in, so it’s not hard to make a variation for a particular dish. Fried eggplant medallions, no problem, that leaves making the pasta. As you can see, it came out good, and tasted better than it looks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

katies

Softshell Crab Almondine at Katie’s

I had the softshell crab almondine, served over a plate of french fries. I winced in pain when I saw all those fries, because I knew I’d be eating them all.

A bit of terminology description is in order here. You’ll see a number of neighborhood restaurants name the sauce on that crab, “Almondine”, but that’s the formal term. A dish like this is usually described in three parts. The base is the softshell crab (as opposed to trout or redfish). When the base is topped with thinly sliced almonds, the style becomes “amandine”. Then the sauce, which is a meunière. The meunière is simple, brown butter, lemon, and parsley. Different cooks will switch it up a bit, maybe adding rosemary instead of parsley, but the standard meunière is a regular at most Creole restaurants in New Orleans.

Anyway, that’s just a bit of Creole cooking talk. The bottom line is the crab and its sauce were delicious!

Dessert!

katies

Dessert fro Debbie Does Doberge

There’s a little bakery, also in Mid City, that specializes in doberge cakes. It’s called Debbie Does Doberge. In addition to doing cakes for all sorts of customers and occasions, they provide desserts to Chef Scot. They also make wonderful cake pops they sell at Twelve Mile Limit,

The special board says Blueberry, but they went through that cake before we ordered dessert, so that slice is PeanutButterScotch. Very much a winner.

Props to Chef Scot and the staff!

Recipe

I don’t have Chef Scot’s recipe for meunière, but here’s a link to Chef Chris DeBarr’s version, for Trout Meunière, courtesy of Judy Walker’s recipes at NOLA.com.

#WineOClock – Sangria at Slice Pizzeria

white sangria

I’m a Sangria junkie, particularly at #WineOClock. Mrs. YatPundit, not so much. On a recent trip to Slice on St. Charles Avenue, the drink special was white sangria. I was all about it. Wife was her usual skeptical self. I told her we could easily get her a glass of something if she didn’t like it, so we went for it.

Citrus-y Sangria for #WineOClock

This sangria was more citrus-y than some, which turned out to be a good thing. Mrs. YatPundit preferred that to the dryer variants out there, as well as the ones that rely more on apples and berries. Every place that does sangria has their own little twist or take on the beverage.

Slice Pizzeria on St. Charles Avenue is a favorite of ours, not just for #WineOClock, either. It’s got two things going for it. First, the pizza is good. Second, it’s easy to get to from #themetrys. All you do is take I-10 into town, get off at the St. Charles exit off the Pontchartrain Expressway (heading up to the Crescent City Connection Bridge). Take a right on St. Charles Avenue and go down to Martin Luther King Blvd. It’s usually easy to park in that first block of MLK off St. Charles. Slice is one building off the corner, next to VooDoo BBQ.

As the name implies, Slice serves pizza by the slice, with a solid list of house special pizzas. You can also build your own. They’ll sell you the entire pie, of course, if you’d rather have your pizza that way. There are also some pasta dishes on the menu. The restaurant also has a solid craft beer list, if you’re not into wine for the evening. It’s a winning dining experience, and when we’re done, it’s very simple to just jump back on the expressway and make the run back to the ‘burbs.

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